Top News

Students envision 75-metre pool with many amenities

Civil engineering technology students Melanie Anthony, left, and Michelle Gohier presented their Capstone Project on a new regional aquatic centre for Corner Brook at the College of the North Atlantic on Wednesday.
Civil engineering technology students Melanie Anthony, left, and Michelle Gohier presented their Capstone Project on a new regional aquatic centre for Corner Brook at the College of the North Atlantic on Wednesday.

Michelle Gohier and Melanie Anthony were not really sure what they were getting into when they undertook a pre-feasibility study and proposed concept design for a new regional aquatic centre for Corner Brook.

The civil engineering technology students at College of the North Atlantic felt the pool would make for a great Capstone Project and provide plenty of learning opportunities.

Operating as Silverline Consultants the pair worked to come up with a design and cost estimate on building a new pool for their clients — the Corner Brook Rapids Swim Club and other community partners.

“To give them a base to go find funding and try to get this movement going,” said Gohier after they presented their final project at the college on Wednesday. It was one of 10 presentations.

About two months in, Anthony said things started to get more exciting as they realized there was a lot of interest in their project.

With help from the college’s business administration and marketing class the pair launched an online survey in January that generated 813 responses to speak to the need for a new facility.

That information was combined with research on similar facilities and cost analysis to come up with three possible designs. The one they are recommending to their clients is a two-storey facility with a 75-metre, eight-lane saltwater pool.

“The building layout met the client’s needs,” said Anthony. But more than that, she said it fits the needs of the community in terms of amenities like a splash pad and indoor play area.

“It’s all about the more,” said Gohier as the space allows for more activities to happen and more revenue with rental spaces and a franchise lease area.

They estimate the cost of the project at $26 million and suggest it be located in the

area of Cpl. Pinksen Memorial Drive.

They also recommend the project proceed with a professional feasibility study and public consultation.

Rapids president Ed Mercer said the next step is to show what Gohier and Anthony have come up with to some of the political people who make decisions.

“Now we have something concrete, we can go and show people what can be achieved, what it can look like, where it can go,” he said.

Mercer said the students put a lot of effort, research and thought into the project and the result was very professional.

With the estimate on construction taking four years, Mercer said time is an issue, especially with the infrastructure issues with the arts and culture centre pool, which he doubts can continue to operate for too much longer.

“Unless something is initiated pretty soon this entire community will be without a pool facility at some point in the very near future.”

 

Possible project schedule

Design phase — 1 year

Construction phase — 2.5 years

Estimate time to complete — 3-4 years

Preferred design

75-metre pool with 8 lanes

Moveable bulkheads — to allow the length of pool to be adjusted and to separate the pool to allow for multiple activities

Moveable floor — to adjust the depth of the pool

Hot pool

Accessibility lifts

Splash pad

Aquatic rock climbing wall

Waterslide

Lazy river

Included amenities

Indoor playground

Fitness/weight room

Multi-purpose area

Sauna and steam room in all change rooms

Kitchen and rental area

Franchise area avail to lease

Viewing area

Offices

Recent Stories