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Corner Brook electrical students put skills to use

Perry Reid, a first-year construction electrician student at College of the North Atlantic in Corner Brook, does his part to help wire the Habitat for Humanity Corner Brook property Friday morning.
Perry Reid, a first-year construction electrician student at College of the North Atlantic in Corner Brook, does his part to help wire the Habitat for Humanity Corner Brook property Friday morning.

Perry Reid was in an upbeat mood Friday morning as he played a role in supporting a good cause while getting a chance to experience life as an electrician on an actual job site.

Mackenzie Piccott assists one of her fellow students Friday morning.

Perry Reid was in an upbeat mood Friday morning as he played a role in supporting a good cause while getting a chance to experience life as an electrician on an actual job site.

Reid, a Rocky Harbour native, was one of the 16 students from the College of the North Atlantic first-year construction electrician class who were doing the electrical work on the Humanity Newfoundland and Labrador Corner Brook property in Curling under the careful eye of instructor Geordie Walsh.

“This is our third day here now and it seems like I’ve learned more now than I did the rest of my life,” Reid said with a chuckle.

Reid was happy to be able to get out of the classroom for a chance at getting some on-hands experience to see what it’s like in the real world. He was also proud to know he was supporting a good cause as two families will move into the duplex property once it has been completed.

Shawn White of Corner Brook was also having fun being part of the team and  getting to do things he only talked about in class. He enjoys being able to play a small part in getting the project completed like others have done since construction began.

“I honestly didn’t think I’d be wiring up an entire house during the first year of my program,” he said.

Walsh was approached to see if the students could possibly lend a hand and he had no problems getting them on board.

He figured the students would benefit from doing the work because they would have a better feel for what the trade involves when they left.

“Somebody’s got to do it so it’s just as well for us to give a hand,” Walsh said.

The guys expected to finish up the job before the end of the day, but they have agreed to come back and do some work once the drywall work has been put to bed.


dkearsey@thewesternstar.com

Twitter: @WS_SportsDesk


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