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Deer Lake companies team up to find solution to potholes

Deer Lake resident Mike Goosney has some ideas to help solve the pothole problem. In this posed photo for The Western Star, Goosney displays some of the piping and plastics he places in a pothole underneath the concrete mixture he fills the potholes with.
Deer Lake resident Mike Goosney has some ideas to help solve the pothole problem. In this posed photo for The Western Star, Goosney displays some of the piping and plastics he places in a pothole underneath the concrete mixture he fills the potholes with.

Most people would be happy if they never saw a pothole again, but Mike Goosney would like to adopt a few.

A pipefitter by trade, Goosney has been around road construction for the last 20 years, so he’s seen a lot of potholes.

While serving on council in Labrador City, he got a rude awakening to the seasons of council — tax season, snowclearing season and pothole season.

As chair of the town’s municipal services, the self-described “over thinker” said he felt there had to be ways to mitigate the issue of potholes and save taxpayers money in the long run.

Five years ago he filled some potholes in Labrador City with concrete, and those repairs are still intact.

Now living in Deer Lake, Goosney is at it again.

Through his company, On Demand Service, he has teamed up with two other Deer Lake companies — Humber Ready Mix and Construction Solutions — to tackle the issue here.

They’ve already filled one pothole near Tim Hortons.

Goosney spilt his coffee going through it more than once and decided, rather than join the complainers, to approach the manager to use it as a test for their plan to fill potholes by putting in drainage.

“It’s something different that we’ve never tried to combat Mother Nature on.”

A month later, the repair is holding up.

Goosney is now in discussions with the town to see if it will “lend” them some potholes to conduct some test trials. He would like to have about half a dozen, in varying sizes from 12 inches to 48 inches.

And it should be no trouble to find them.

“That’s one good thing about it, they’re everywhere.”

The plan is to fill the potholes with one of three mixtures and monitor them over the next few months. Goosney said he hopes to have some clear data on what works by next spring. He’s looking to have the drainage system patented and eventually take it to market.

Pothole fix

Mike Goosney’s pothole fix involves injecting a drill rod — similar to directional drilling — into the hole and then installing a perforated piping system to provide drainage.

The size of the pipe used depends on the size of the pothole.

The theory is that the pipe will act as an expansion joint that won’t allow the pothole to pop up or drop down. And the thought is it won’t create a pothole under a pothole.

The pothole fillers being tested include concrete, cold patch and hot patch. The mixes used include an additive never used in North America. Goosney calls it their “secret recipe.”

It takes about 15 minutes to complete the work — not much longer than it would for a normal road crew to fill a pothole.

No two potholes are alike

Goosney says there are 40 different types of potholes.

Did you know?

Indexing formulas can be used to predict where a pothole will appear.

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