Top News

Thirst for senior hockey

['Editorial']
['Editorial']

There seems to be some excitement afoot at the reinstatement of the West Coast Senior Hockey League with three weeks of games taking place.

It all got underway on Saturday with a game between the Corner Brook Royals and the Deer Lake Red Wings at the Hodder Memorial Recreation Complex in Deer Lake.

There seems to be a real thirst for the game in Stephenville and Port aux Basques, where it’s been a long time since anyone suited up for senior hockey for either the Jets or Mariners.

It will be interesting to see how many people show up at the respective arenas to watch their teams play, especially since they will be cheering on players that are from the area in which they live.

In the past, senior hockey has brought a lot of enthusiasm to the different communities when the games were held. When more and more imported players were brought in, keeping it going required fundraising that got out of hand.

This March schedule is a test ground to see if senior hockey can work once again in Western Newfoundland and return with a longer schedule next season.

The success of the league is likely to hinge on whether local players can put off a game of hockey that is competitive enough to get fans in the arena and have them return.

It’s often much more than just what happens on the ice with the rivalries between the different towns that can determine the success of a hockey league. The support from the community, from individuals attending the games to the business community getting behind it, can also add to it.

If the teams are competitive, they will also drag along fans to each community in which they play and that helps the bottom lines for those communities they visit and their own when others come.

There’s lots of chatter about the return of the Jets in Stephenville as there likely is in the other participating communities, but it’s the amount of people who show up to the games that will ultimately determine the league’s real success.

Local hockey has worked in the past and handled the right way, it can work again. Those who have ventured to get it on the go again deserve praise but need to keep in mind lessons of the past and the importance of keeping it local.

It all got underway on Saturday with a game between the Corner Brook Royals and the Deer Lake Red Wings at the Hodder Memorial Recreation Complex in Deer Lake.

There seems to be a real thirst for the game in Stephenville and Port aux Basques, where it’s been a long time since anyone suited up for senior hockey for either the Jets or Mariners.

It will be interesting to see how many people show up at the respective arenas to watch their teams play, especially since they will be cheering on players that are from the area in which they live.

In the past, senior hockey has brought a lot of enthusiasm to the different communities when the games were held. When more and more imported players were brought in, keeping it going required fundraising that got out of hand.

This March schedule is a test ground to see if senior hockey can work once again in Western Newfoundland and return with a longer schedule next season.

The success of the league is likely to hinge on whether local players can put off a game of hockey that is competitive enough to get fans in the arena and have them return.

It’s often much more than just what happens on the ice with the rivalries between the different towns that can determine the success of a hockey league. The support from the community, from individuals attending the games to the business community getting behind it, can also add to it.

If the teams are competitive, they will also drag along fans to each community in which they play and that helps the bottom lines for those communities they visit and their own when others come.

There’s lots of chatter about the return of the Jets in Stephenville as there likely is in the other participating communities, but it’s the amount of people who show up to the games that will ultimately determine the league’s real success.

Local hockey has worked in the past and handled the right way, it can work again. Those who have ventured to get it on the go again deserve praise but need to keep in mind lessons of the past and the importance of keeping it local.

Latest News