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Changes to catching small game

['Letter to the editor']
['Letter to the editor']

To Whom It May Concern: My letter is to bring some attention to the current requirements and recent changes to catching small game, particularly rabbit snaring.

As you may be aware, the requirements for snaring were recently changed so that snares would have to be made of brass wire vs the previously used stainless steel wire. Justification for the changes were based on it being the more humane practice.  

My husband is avid hunter so when the season opened this year, he abided by the law and used the brass wire to set his normal trap lines using the new material and was met with a grim result.  On average 9 of the 10 snares he set were broken off which unfortunately leaves the escaped rabbits with a brass wire necklace as an unpleasant souvenir!  I can be empathetic that old practices need to be reviewed and revised if needed but I question how humane is it to allow the escaped rabbits to wear a brass collor until it deteriorates around thier neck?  

Thus far my husband has lost up to 50 rabbits in this season alone for this reason.  Not only is this frustrating for a person who has been doing this their whole lives but it is very difficult to understand how this is better practice when we now have 50 rabbits with a brass collar from just one hunter alone. 

We have had numerous conversation with other locals and hunters who are all experiencing the same results.  The brass wire is not effective for trapping and for the few rabbits we/they have caught, some of them already have 2-3 brass rings around their neck from previous near misses.  Others have even shared that they have resorted to using the stainless steel wire regardless of regulation.

So let us consider how many small game hunters we have in the local area and then how many rabbits they have “lost” in their trapping this year?  What is the long term effect of the snare rings that are left behind on all these animals?  What health risk does it lead to as this brass deteriorates?  As avid hunters people want to respect the land and the animals and the law but how can we believe this better for the animals?  How was this decision made and what information proves this was the better way?  How can it be healthy to leave these animals with cracked off snares around their necks and for how long? I personally have severe concerns about this.  

In my opinion, this decision needs to be reviewed or other alternatives should be considered.  What do you think?

Sincerely,

Debbie Noseworthy

709-643-3747

As you may be aware, the requirements for snaring were recently changed so that snares would have to be made of brass wire vs the previously used stainless steel wire. Justification for the changes were based on it being the more humane practice.  

My husband is avid hunter so when the season opened this year, he abided by the law and used the brass wire to set his normal trap lines using the new material and was met with a grim result.  On average 9 of the 10 snares he set were broken off which unfortunately leaves the escaped rabbits with a brass wire necklace as an unpleasant souvenir!  I can be empathetic that old practices need to be reviewed and revised if needed but I question how humane is it to allow the escaped rabbits to wear a brass collor until it deteriorates around thier neck?  

Thus far my husband has lost up to 50 rabbits in this season alone for this reason.  Not only is this frustrating for a person who has been doing this their whole lives but it is very difficult to understand how this is better practice when we now have 50 rabbits with a brass collar from just one hunter alone. 

We have had numerous conversation with other locals and hunters who are all experiencing the same results.  The brass wire is not effective for trapping and for the few rabbits we/they have caught, some of them already have 2-3 brass rings around their neck from previous near misses.  Others have even shared that they have resorted to using the stainless steel wire regardless of regulation.

So let us consider how many small game hunters we have in the local area and then how many rabbits they have “lost” in their trapping this year?  What is the long term effect of the snare rings that are left behind on all these animals?  What health risk does it lead to as this brass deteriorates?  As avid hunters people want to respect the land and the animals and the law but how can we believe this better for the animals?  How was this decision made and what information proves this was the better way?  How can it be healthy to leave these animals with cracked off snares around their necks and for how long? I personally have severe concerns about this.  

In my opinion, this decision needs to be reviewed or other alternatives should be considered.  What do you think?

Sincerely,

Debbie Noseworthy

709-643-3747

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