Top News

Academic, author Brett Favaro bringing climate change message to Corner Brook

Brett Favaro, academic director of the fisheries science graduate programs at the Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland, is in Corner Brook to discuss the need to prepare for the effects climate change.
Brett Favaro, academic director of the fisheries science graduate programs at the Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland, is in Corner Brook to discuss the need to prepare for the effects climate change.

Brett Favaro says anyone can be a climate-change hero.

It’s not that hard to do.

The academic director of the fisheries science graduate programs at the Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland is in Corner Brook this week to help spread that message.

He will be making a lunchtime address to the Rotary Club of Corner Brook today before an evening address at the Corner Brook Civic Centre marking today being World Oceans Day.

He said climate change really results from changes to the world’s oceans and it is up to each and every person to do their share to prepare for the changes that will occur and adapt to those that have happened already.

“One of the frustrating things is that climate change is this huge issue that affects so many people and you may wonder how can I make a difference,” he said.

Simple things like buying an electric car or riding a bike to work are all important steps towards addressing the global problem. He said others will eventually see these are good ideas and, in turn, the levels of government will have to recognize it, too, and accommodate measures to deal with the effects of changing climactic conditions.

Favaro, whose book “The Carbon Code” is a guide to becoming a climate-change hero, said climate change is indeed a siege for which there is no silver bullet to solve. That’s why he feels it’s crucial that everything that everyone can do about it needs to be considered.

“The reality is, the world is changing around us,” he said. “So, we can either change to lead it or struggle to keep up. Climate change is going to force us to make these kinds of decisions.”

The best thing about making these adaptations, noted Favaro, is that most of them can be economically beneficial. A municipality purchasing electric vehicles for its fleet, for instance, will save money in energy consumption and maintenance.

Favaro toured Corner Brook Pulp and Paper after arriving in town Wednesday. He said the mill’s efforts to reduce water consumption and recoup unused energy may be environmentally friendly initiatives, but are actually cost-saving measures.

The more people who do their part to be a climate-change hero in their own lives and demand that decision makers follow suit, the better chance the political will to make changes will take hold.

“We can ask the government to do things on our behalf but it’s going to be a lot easier for them to do things if they know the population has their back,” said Favaro. “If people are calling for climate change action, then it’s going to be hard for government not to do it.”

Recent Stories