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Coastal erosion a big concern locally and around the world

Graham Oliver of the Bay St. George Climate Action Network looks down at some of the coastal erosion near Marine Drive in Kippens, where landowners have lost property due to the bank foundering behind their homes. FRANK GALE/ THE WESTERN STAR
Graham Oliver of the Bay St. George Climate Action Network looks down at some of the coastal erosion near Marine Drive in Kippens, where landowners have lost property due to the bank foundering behind their homes. FRANK GALE/ THE WESTERN STAR - Frank Gale

Graham Oliver organizing a climate strike march for Friday

KIPPENS, N.L. —

FRANK GALE
THE WESTERN STAR

KIPPENS
Graham Oliver says nobody in the Bay St. George area has to go far to see the effects of coastal erosion.
Embankments near the shorelines in Stephenville, Kippens and Port au Port are foundering more and more each year.
That’s why the member of the Bay St. George Climate Action Network is organizing events for Global Climate Action Week, taking place Sept. 20-27.
Standing next to an area that has eroded near Marine Drive in his hometown of Kippens, he said it is proof coastal erosion is happening now, just as it is around the planet.
The avid kayaker has passed along this area often in the last 15 years. He is amazed just how much land has been lost along this coastline.
“Coastal erosion is a big thing, as seas are rising due to global warming and there are more violent storms, making it critical for many populated areas around the world,” Oliver said.
He said in Bangladesh, a low-lying country, people are having to move because of flooding and erosion.
“With the right conditions, if the Gravels on the Port au Port Peninsula ever washes out, then the peninsula becomes an island,” Oliver said.
Stephenville, with its beach area, golf course and other infrastructure — like the airport — being not very much above sea level, he said it all could be prone to getting washed out.
“A perfect storm could wipe out a community like Lark Harbour or Frenchman’s Cove in the Bay of Islands, which are both close to sea level,” Oliver said.
He noted how the road in Fox Island River is being repaired almost annually because of coastal erosion and having to be shored up with armour stone.
Maurice Woodfine, who lives at 11 Marine Drive, said coastal erosion is a real worry where he lives. He’s after losing about six to seven feet of property in the past 10 years.
He plans to move a gazebo he has on the back part of his property. It overlooks the ocean, sitting close to the edge of a property that has eroded and has about a 100-foot drop to the shore.
Woodfine feels something needs to be done to prevent further erosion at the location because of all the properties threatened by the steady wearing away of the coastal banks.

frank.gale@thewesternstar.com

About the Climate Change March:

• The Bay St. George Climate Action Network will be hosting a climate strike march Friday, Sept. 20 at 3:30 p.m.

• This event will mark the opening of Global Climate Action Week, which runs from Sept. 20 -27.

• The two-kilometre march will start at the St. Stephen's church parking lot.

• A brief discussion about climate change will be held at 3 p.m. on the deck of the Killick Café prior to the march.

• Organizers are encouraging families, grandparents and school students to come out in solidarity with citizens all over the world who will be marching to show their concern for climate change.

• The march, in consultation with other marches around the world, is being held just prior to the 2019 Climate Action Summit, which takes place Sept. 23 and is aimed at addressing the climate change challenge.

Source: Graham Oliver

 

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