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Ride Down AddyLayne promotes getting people talking

Being consoled by Candace Simon, right, Sarah Chaffey-Legge, who lost her father Glen Chaffey to suicide, gives some words of advice during a reception in Stephenville for the “Ride Down AddyLayne” trip across Canada to promote speaking out about mental health.
Being consoled by Candace Simon, right, Sarah Chaffey-Legge, who lost her father Glen Chaffey to suicide, gives some words of advice during a reception in Stephenville for the “Ride Down AddyLayne” trip across Canada to promote speaking out about mental health. - Frank Gale
STEPHENVILLE, N.L. —

Words of advice from Sarah Chaffey-Legge are to be kind, speak out more and reach out to those in need.
“You never know what someone’s story is or what’s actually hiding behind a smile,” she told a large crowd on hand at the Bay St. George YMCA last Wednesday.
Her words came during an open mic segment of a reception for the Ride Down AddyLayne initiative to raise awareness and money for the Canadian Mental Health Association, carried out by David and Rochelle Hynes, both formerly of Stephenville, now living in Fort McMurray, Alta.
Chaffey-Legge, who lost her dad Glen Chaffey to suicide on July 30, 2016, said because of the Hynes’s initiative many people are stepping forward and sharing their stories.
She said she never thought in a million years she would be speaking on suicide or sharing a story of a loved one lost to suicide.
“Today I speak in memory of my dad and many others who have left us too soon,” Chaffey-Legge said.
Through tears she said after spending time with her dad at his home she didn’t think when she walked out his door it would be the last time she would ever see him.
“My dad cried for help, I cried for help for him; however, a blind eye was turned,” she said.
Chaffey-Legge was six months pregnant at the time with her son, her father’s first and only grandchild and as delighted as he was about it, this terrible disease had taken over and took him from their family.
Vanessa Lee, a youth engagement coordinator with the Community Youth Network, said through her work she deals with mental health issues and she thanked David and Rochelle for what they were doing.
She encouraged people not to be afraid to say they are sorry and added a smile can go a long way.
Michelle Skinner of Mental Health and Addictions located at 127 Montana Drive said every person lost to suicide has an impact on the community.
She said there is help for people and they can get it by calling the 811 Healthline.
Rochelle said the reception was an honour, overwhelming and amazing.
“We appreciate it and we’re happy with everyone who turned out,” David said.
They said they did the ride because of the loss of friends Jason White and Christiana (Cece) Cormier this spring, along with others.


Highlights of Ride Down AddyLayne:

• Bike – 2018 Indian Chieftain with 1811 cc engine.
• June 23 to July 3 (Fort McMurray to Vancouver to St. John’s to Stephenville).
• 950 km to 1,000 km per day.
• No maintenance along the way, new rear tire installed prior to ride.
• Fuel stops – four per day with about $80 of fuel per day.
• Met more than 100 people along the route.
• Wildlife seen – four bears, one deer and a dead moose.
• Highlight – reception at Bay St. George YMCA in Stephenville.

Source: David Hynes
 

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