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Much ado about McCurdy’s tweets

['WS-xx-letter to the editor']
['WS-xx-letter to the editor']

Dear Editor: In Friday’s edition of The Western Star Feb. 3 — believe it or not, on the front page (“McCurdy feels heat for tweets”) — NDP Leader Earle McCurdy is taken to task and chastised by Twitter users and others for his supposedly offensive remarks toward women.

His reference to the word “woman” in his tweets seemed to annoy many, even to a point where his remarks were interpreted as sexist. Apologies were demanded by many women and, of course, the knight in shining armour, the professional politician, the windbag himself — Mr. Twitter, the member for Mount Pearl North. Give us a break!
Enough! This nonsense should stop. McCurdy, no doubt, in his role as NDP leader, is always spewing out innuendo to counter that of his opponents in both provincial and federal politics, same as any member of an opposition party. That’s their job. Governments in power need to be challenged.
From time to time, the interpretation of one’s meaning can be subject to criticism. Someone may take offence to remarks. In this particular instance, McCurdy apologized if he had offended anyone — in this case, a sign of weakness. Apologize for what? If he had used the word “man” instead of woman in his tweets, his remarks wouldn’t have been noticed, let alone appear as a lead story in The Telegram.
Far too often, certain groups of women — the perennial complainers, the habitual protesters — remark that their gender is under attack. It’s to a point now where it has become total hogwash. Lighten up! Dare I say, ladies, don’t be offended by remarks that you interpret as demeaning to you and tweet about it. Look around and note the intelligent, smart women that we have here in this province, in the press, in the government, in the opposition party and the private sector. Most women I know I respect and admire, as do most men. They earn our respect through their contribution to our well-being and their ability to express themselves with their peers. Their knowledge, combined with their wit and humour, is a formidable force. They don’t fall prey to trivial remarks that are interpreted out of context.
Twitter use is fine.

However, abuse it and you become a “twit.”

Ed Ralph, St. John’s

His reference to the word “woman” in his tweets seemed to annoy many, even to a point where his remarks were interpreted as sexist. Apologies were demanded by many women and, of course, the knight in shining armour, the professional politician, the windbag himself — Mr. Twitter, the member for Mount Pearl North. Give us a break!
Enough! This nonsense should stop. McCurdy, no doubt, in his role as NDP leader, is always spewing out innuendo to counter that of his opponents in both provincial and federal politics, same as any member of an opposition party. That’s their job. Governments in power need to be challenged.
From time to time, the interpretation of one’s meaning can be subject to criticism. Someone may take offence to remarks. In this particular instance, McCurdy apologized if he had offended anyone — in this case, a sign of weakness. Apologize for what? If he had used the word “man” instead of woman in his tweets, his remarks wouldn’t have been noticed, let alone appear as a lead story in The Telegram.
Far too often, certain groups of women — the perennial complainers, the habitual protesters — remark that their gender is under attack. It’s to a point now where it has become total hogwash. Lighten up! Dare I say, ladies, don’t be offended by remarks that you interpret as demeaning to you and tweet about it. Look around and note the intelligent, smart women that we have here in this province, in the press, in the government, in the opposition party and the private sector. Most women I know I respect and admire, as do most men. They earn our respect through their contribution to our well-being and their ability to express themselves with their peers. Their knowledge, combined with their wit and humour, is a formidable force. They don’t fall prey to trivial remarks that are interpreted out of context.
Twitter use is fine.

However, abuse it and you become a “twit.”

Ed Ralph, St. John’s

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