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They ought to leave 'business education' to businesses

['WS-xx-letter to the editor']
['WS-xx-letter to the editor']

Dear editor: “Culture shift needed,” said a headline in The Western Star. I agree, though not necessarily regarding the exact kind of culture shift urged upon Newfoundland in the story under that headline, which would emphasize entrepreneurship and innovation.

For the best dictionary I possess defines entrepreneurship as effective control of commerce, and commerce means buying and selling far more than it means actual production of what people need or merely desire. Innovation, as I understand it, in this context means coming up with new things to sell or merely new ways to get people to buy these things.

The culture shift I think we most need would emphasize those who produce good things, as opposed to those who only buy and sell, are the ones who most deserve to enjoy what is good. A real culture shift, instead of going further in our current direction, as I believe the story really advocated, would emphasize the human worth of being able to deserve what we want and would emphasize the methods of production by which people truly deserve what is in fact produced, since there are both worthy and unworthy methods of production.

The right kind of culture shift would emphasize that people ought to have the courage to forgo what, because they have not properly produced it, they do not deserve.

It is even more important that what is due be done than that people benefit from doing it.

The right kind of culture shift would emphasize that universities ought to educate us in standards which are inherently worth following, personal qualities inherently worth sharing, and truth inherently worth contemplating.

Universities that omitted from education such instances of universal fittingness would be failing, even if such fittingness were only universal fictions, to teach something one can know about the universe; they ought to leave “business education” to businesses and businessmen.

For one of the great inequities of both business and education in Newfoundland now is that young people are obliged to pay for training in occupations in which their future employers ought to pay to train them; almost anyone truly educated, whether at university or even in high school, can take quite readily to on-the-job training in any worthy occupation.

Colin Burke, Port au Port

For the best dictionary I possess defines entrepreneurship as effective control of commerce, and commerce means buying and selling far more than it means actual production of what people need or merely desire. Innovation, as I understand it, in this context means coming up with new things to sell or merely new ways to get people to buy these things.

The culture shift I think we most need would emphasize those who produce good things, as opposed to those who only buy and sell, are the ones who most deserve to enjoy what is good. A real culture shift, instead of going further in our current direction, as I believe the story really advocated, would emphasize the human worth of being able to deserve what we want and would emphasize the methods of production by which people truly deserve what is in fact produced, since there are both worthy and unworthy methods of production.

The right kind of culture shift would emphasize that people ought to have the courage to forgo what, because they have not properly produced it, they do not deserve.

It is even more important that what is due be done than that people benefit from doing it.

The right kind of culture shift would emphasize that universities ought to educate us in standards which are inherently worth following, personal qualities inherently worth sharing, and truth inherently worth contemplating.

Universities that omitted from education such instances of universal fittingness would be failing, even if such fittingness were only universal fictions, to teach something one can know about the universe; they ought to leave “business education” to businesses and businessmen.

For one of the great inequities of both business and education in Newfoundland now is that young people are obliged to pay for training in occupations in which their future employers ought to pay to train them; almost anyone truly educated, whether at university or even in high school, can take quite readily to on-the-job training in any worthy occupation.

Colin Burke, Port au Port

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