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Surrounded by ice at the Brier all the sunshine Keating couple needs

Corner Brook’s Bern and Diane Keating pose for a photo while taking in the action on the ice at the 2017 Tim Hortons Brier in St. John’s this week.
Corner Brook’s Bern and Diane Keating pose for a photo while taking in the action on the ice at the 2017 Tim Hortons Brier in St. John’s this week.

Bern and Diane Keating had a chance to spend a week surrounded by ice or soak up the rays on a beach down south.

Being diehard curling fans, they chose to stick out the winter at home.

The Corner Brook couple chose to spend their vacation time watching the Tim Hortons Brier unfold at Mile One in St. John’s.

It’s a decision they don’t regret.

The Keatings have been glued to the action all week as Newfoundland and Labrador’s Brad Gushue rink tries to win the national men’s curling championship in an effort to become the first rink to do so since Jack MacDuff did it in 1976.

Bern loves to watch some of the best curlers in the world throw stones, but he also loves the social aspect of the sport because it has allowed him to meet some pretty neat characters over the years.

It’s his second time watching the Brier in person, having done so back in 2010 when the event was staged in Halifax.

He loves the music. He loves the food. He loves seeing the Newfoundland flags waving in the crowd when Gushue and company make a big shot.

Usually, he said, curling is a sport that’s played without a lot of cheering and emotion from the crowd, but the fans have been boisterous at times. Keating figures there are some people not familiar with the way the game is played because they sometimes cheer when Gushue’s opponent misses a shot and that’s rare in the curling world.

“In fact, Gushue said this morning he doesn’t mind too much because that’s what they did to him over in Italy when he was at the Olympics,” Keating said.

Meeting people from all walks of life from various parts of the country is one of the best parts of the experience for Keating and he was reminded of that one day this week when he ran into a guy from Black Duck Cove who remembered meeting the Keatings in Halifax at the 2010 Brier.

“To have somebody from Black Duck Cove remember you was pretty funny,” he said.

The level of curling has really been impressive and he expected it to be with two former Olympians in the mix with a number of guys who have won the Brier before.

But, he didn’t expect Gushue and company to play with the poise they have been with so much pressure and a large contingent of fans expecting them to turn heads at home.

“You have to stay calm, so despite all the shouting and cheering, the fact they are still getting the job done is great to see,” he said.

Long days in the arena all week are just fine with him. It’s a sunny day for the Keatings when rocks are being thrown.

Being diehard curling fans, they chose to stick out the winter at home.

The Corner Brook couple chose to spend their vacation time watching the Tim Hortons Brier unfold at Mile One in St. John’s.

It’s a decision they don’t regret.

The Keatings have been glued to the action all week as Newfoundland and Labrador’s Brad Gushue rink tries to win the national men’s curling championship in an effort to become the first rink to do so since Jack MacDuff did it in 1976.

Bern loves to watch some of the best curlers in the world throw stones, but he also loves the social aspect of the sport because it has allowed him to meet some pretty neat characters over the years.

It’s his second time watching the Brier in person, having done so back in 2010 when the event was staged in Halifax.

He loves the music. He loves the food. He loves seeing the Newfoundland flags waving in the crowd when Gushue and company make a big shot.

Usually, he said, curling is a sport that’s played without a lot of cheering and emotion from the crowd, but the fans have been boisterous at times. Keating figures there are some people not familiar with the way the game is played because they sometimes cheer when Gushue’s opponent misses a shot and that’s rare in the curling world.

“In fact, Gushue said this morning he doesn’t mind too much because that’s what they did to him over in Italy when he was at the Olympics,” Keating said.

Meeting people from all walks of life from various parts of the country is one of the best parts of the experience for Keating and he was reminded of that one day this week when he ran into a guy from Black Duck Cove who remembered meeting the Keatings in Halifax at the 2010 Brier.

“To have somebody from Black Duck Cove remember you was pretty funny,” he said.

The level of curling has really been impressive and he expected it to be with two former Olympians in the mix with a number of guys who have won the Brier before.

But, he didn’t expect Gushue and company to play with the poise they have been with so much pressure and a large contingent of fans expecting them to turn heads at home.

“You have to stay calm, so despite all the shouting and cheering, the fact they are still getting the job done is great to see,” he said.

Long days in the arena all week are just fine with him. It’s a sunny day for the Keatings when rocks are being thrown.

Corner Brook’s Bern and Diane Keating pose for a photo while taking in the action on the ice at the 2017 Tim Hortons Brier in St. John’s this week.

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